Book Review: One Life by Megan Rapinoe



Megan Rapinoe grew up in a Conservative family. Her dad voted for Donald Trump. She's gay and unapologetically vocal about her beliefs. She's tiny in her stature, and yet, she's fearless. Even as far as going against her family's political leanings. She's faced censure from the league in which she played, even as far as being benched by her coach. All because she decided to kneel as the Star Spangled Banner played. But still, she persisted. 

She's won awards, accolades, suffered injuries and heartbreaks. But still, she persisted. 

If you are expecting this memoir about how an athlete rallied to defeat everything against all odds, you would only be partly right. Because amongst everything, Rapinoe uses her platform for activism. And this book is about that. Facing censure against a league who didn't want to change the status quo, she persisted in raising awareness about the racial injustices in America. And when she's not doing that, she's rallying the women of the league to get their due. The economic inequality between professional men and women soccer players is beyond laughable.  The women's team have won more games, gold medals, and championships than the men's team, and yet they only make half of what they earned. 

Truthfully, I've never followed Women's Soccer until Megan made an enemy of the White House. Since then, I've been a huge follower. What I admire about her the most is that she took the time to educate herself about racial disparities before she opened her mouth. She read books, talked to people, and did her research. She learned about redlining which is a bank's way of denying mortgages to people of colour who live in a district that they deemed 'dangerous'. She also talked about how the GI bill that excludes Black vets from receiving benefits. These are just two racial issues that she's learned on her researches. She was the first white athlete to kneel in solidarity with Colin Kaepernick. Honestly, what's not to love? 

We never really learn about Megan Rapinoe in her memoir. She barely talked about her childhood, her twin sister. Though she was very candid about her brother's ongoing battle with addiction. Mostly, I think the main purpose of her book is to show how someone of her stature and clout could use her privilege for the good. 


Comments

  1. I'm not sure it would be a book for me I confess but the topic is an interesting one

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  2. She is amazing! I love that she took the time to learn and to research. This is how white allies should be.

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  3. Ooh, I don't do very many non-fiction books but I have been interested in reading this one because I did read somewhere that she educated herself about the racial injustices that she's super passionate about. I really like her and am a big fan of hers so thanks for reviewing this one.

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  4. I’ll fully admit I’ve not heard of her but it sounds like she’s rattled a few cages, her story could be interesting.

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  5. Cna't say I knew who she was, women's football, not my thing, any sport, not my thing lol. But I really want to read a memoir. I try one once a year, but last year nothing :/

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  6. I hate to admit that I don't know this woman but she sounds remarkable. This sounds like a powerful read.

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  7. I've not heard of her but this story is interesting and it sounds very good.

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  8. A remarkable woman. I didn't know anything about her until she made headlines. This sounds like an inspiring read.

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  9. I love that she stands up and when she went against the white House she became my hero. I'd love to learn more about her but honestly I just admire her guts.

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  10. I have to be honest I know nothing about her at all, but she sounds like my kind of person from this review. I also like that she also educated herself on race and included it in her activism as well.

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  11. She's always sounded like an amazing person. I like that she is showing everyone can make a difference if they just educate themselves in her book. Kind of a bummer it's not more of a personal memoir, but it seems to work.

    -Lauren
    www.shootingstarsmag.net

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